A free, public STEM high school in Herriman, Utah.

Course Offerings

COURSE OFFERINGS

Courses are offered on a student demand basis and so some courses may not be available if the student need/want is not high enough.

ARTS


Performing Arts


Choir: Advanced Ladies Choir (A) 10-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Audition

Description: This course is composed of a select group of experienced and knowledgeable singers (Sopranos/Altos). Emphasis is on performance and choral literature. Rehearsals and performances outside of class time are part of the course requirement and constitute a portion of the grade.



Chamber Choir (Madrigals) (A) 10-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Audition

Description: This course is composed of a select group of experienced and knowledgeable singers. Emphasis is on performance and choral literature. Rehearsals and performances outside of class time are part of the course requirement and constitute a portion of the grade. Students enrolled in Chamber Choir must also be enrolled in a second music course (Concert Choir preferred).


Choir I Soprano/Alto (A) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

Description: This music course is open to all students with a vocal range of soprano or alto. Two, three, and four-part music is performed at various concerts. Primary consideration is given to part-singing, good vocal production, and rudiments of music. Rehearsals and performances outside of class time are part of the course requirement and constitute a portion of the grade.


Choir I Tenor/Bass (A) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: None

Description: This music course is open to all students with a vocal range of tenor or bass. Ability to match pitch may be helpful. Two, three, and four-part music is performed at various concerts. Primary consideration is given to part-singing, good vocal production, and the rudiments of music. Rehearsals and performances outside of the class time are part of the course requirement and constitute a portion of the grade.


Concert Choir (A Cappella) (A) 10-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Audition

Description: This vocal music group course is concerned with advanced choral literature and techniques of singing. Rehearsals and performances outside of class time are part of the course requirement and constitute a portion of the grade.


Music Composition (MIDI) (A) 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

Description: This is an individualized semester course in the use of technology in music. The class will focus on electronic sequencing (multi-track recording), and computer-assisted music writing. This is a hands-on course in the use of MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface). Students need a background in basic piano skills, computer skills, and in music reading skills.


Music Theory AP (A) 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Instructor approval/May require a workbook

Description: This course is designed for students who are college-oriented and choose to participate in the AP program. Elements include music theory, history, composition, and analysis. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the AP exam.


Musical Theater 8002: (A) 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: Theater II

Fees/Materials: Will be determined

Description: This performance course will include the study of musical theater from its beginnings to current day. Students will be expected to perform and showcase in a variety of venues. This course is designed for the advanced theater student in the study of musical dance theater.


Social Dance 800: (A) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description: Social Dance for most of the year is taken up with teaching various line-dances (from all genres of music). For about 2 or 3 weeks each quarter, the students also learn different ballroom dance forms such as; the Cha Cha, Rumba, East Coast Swing, and Nightclub 2-Step.


Theater I (Beginning Theater) 8001: (A) 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description: Students explore the fundamentals of acting as the actor uses his voice, mind, and body, through the utilization of exercises and games, through which the students develop ensemble and individual performance skills.


Theater II (A) 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: Theater I

Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description: This performance course will include the history of theater and develop, through workshop exercises, dramatic techniques in acting from improvisation to play production. Students will perform skits, scenes and plays to enjoy the experience of acting. Actors hone in on their prior acting skills and develop different characters.


Visual Arts

Illustration Foundations 8008: (A) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course is designed to provide students with knowledge pertaining to the arts and opportunities for project based experience within Illustration careers. Concepts and techniques explored will include practical experience for portfolio work in both the traditional and digital arts.

Water Coloring 8009: (A) 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course is designed to provide students with knowledge pertaining to the arts and opportunities for project based experience within the focused medium of watercolor painting. Concepts and techniques explored will include practical experience for portfolio work in a variety of sizes and subjects.




Visual Arts


Illustration Foundations 8008: (A) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course is designed to provide students with knowledge pertaining to the arts and opportunities for project based experience within Illustration careers. Concepts and techniques explored will include practical experience for portfolio work in both the traditional and digital arts.


Water Coloring 8009: (A) 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course is designed to provide students with knowledge pertaining to the arts and opportunities for project based experience within the focused medium of watercolor painting. Concepts and techniques explored will include practical experience for portfolio work in a variety of sizes and subjects.




Career and Technology Courses


Technology


3D Graphics & Animation 7003: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: Digital Media I

Description: Throughout the year, students will use 3D graphics software to produce and animate 3D models. This course will introduce students to 2D and 3D modeling, the creation and application of textures, mapping, lighting, camera techniques, and the rendering of 3D models. It will also introduce students to animation planning, storyboard development, and the animation production process.


Accounting (Edgenuity) 2008: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description: Students will develop skills, beginning with an understanding of the basic elements and concepts of double-entry accounting systems related to service businesses organized as a sole proprietorship. Skills include understanding the accounting equation, analyzing business transactions, entering transactions in journals, posting to ledgers, compiling end-of-period financial statements, preparing closing entries, and managing cash.


Business Management  9004: (CTE) 9-12

Credits: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This Business Management course seeks to develop sound management concepts within students, as management plays a role in any future employment opportunity. Students are able to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data from the other functional areas of business (e.g., marketing, finance, and production/operation). Effective management requires decision-making abilities, long-range planning knowledge, human relations expertise, and motivational skills. Students learn the four basic functions of management: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling.


Coaching 9006: (CTE) 9-12

Credits: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: Introduction to philosophy, methods, and theories of coaching, basic physiology, psychology, sports medicine, pedagogy, and sports management.


Computer Programming I 6004: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites:  None

Description: An introductory course in computer programming/software engineering and applications. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students will learn to design, code, and test their own programs while applying mathematical concepts. Teachers introduce concepts and problem solving skills to beginning students through a programming language such as C++, C#, Java, Python, or JavaScript.

The second half of the year reviews and builds on the concepts introduced in the first semester. This semester introduces students to more complex data structures and their uses, including sequential files, arrays, and classes. Students will learn to create more powerful programs.


Computer Programming II 6005: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: Computer Programming I

Description: This is an advanced course in computer programming/software engineering and applications. It reviews and builds on the concepts introduced in Computer Programming I. It introduces students to dynamic data structures, advanced utilization of classes, and applications of recursion through the application of mathematical concepts.


Computer Technology (Edgenuity) 7000: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: .5

Prerequisites: None

Description: This is an introduction to computer application software that encompasses document processing, spreadsheets, and presentations. An understanding of ethics and use of operating systems, information resources, and electronic mail is included. Students will have the opportunity to earn Microsoft industry certifications in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Skills gained will be demonstrated by creating a project for a different content area.


Digital Electronic 6002: (CTE 9-12)

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: Digital Literacy

Description: Students explore the foundations of computing by engaging in circuit design processes to create combinational logic and sequential logic (memory) as electrical engineers do in industry.


Digital Literacy (Edgenuity) (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: None, intended for 9th grade

Description: This course is an introduction to computer literacy. Students will have opportunities to use technology and develop skills that encourage creativity, critical thinking, productivity, and collaboration in the classroom and day-to-day life. Skills will be demonstrated by creating a project for a different content area. This course is aligned with national and international standards and the Utah Core to prepare students across multiple levels of skills. Students will complete this course with a prerequisite to move into high school computer literacy courses.


Digital Media I 7001: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: Digital Media is the process of analyzing, designing and developing interactive media. Digital Media I is the first-year digital media course where students will create and learn digital media applications while using elements of text, graphics, animation, sound, video, and digital imaging for various formats. These abilities will prepare students for entry-level multimedia positions and provide fundamental 21st Century Learning skills beneficial for other occupational/educational endeavors.


Digital Media II 7002: (CTE) 10-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: Digital Media I

Fees/Materials: None

Description: Digital Media II is a course designed to teach the process of planning, instructional design, development, and publishing of digital media and interactive media projects. Digital Media II is the second year course within digital media pathway where students will focus on developing advanced skills to plan, design, and create interactive projects using the elements of text, 2-D and 3-D graphics, animation, sound, video, digital imaging, interactive projects, etc. These skills can prepare students for entry-level positions and other occupational/educational goals.


Game Development Fundamentals I  7004: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: Digital Media I

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and project based experience of fundamental gaming development concepts relating to STEM. These concepts include game design, scripting, creation of digital assets, graphic resources, animations, understanding hardware, problem solving, critical thinking, collaboration, and project management.


Game Development Fundamentals II 7005: (CTE) 10-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: Game Development Fundamentals I

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course is the second year and is designed to provide students with further knowledge and project based experience of fundamental gaming development concepts relating to STEM. These concepts include game design, scripting, creation of digital assets, graphic resources, animations, understanding hardware, problem solving, critical thinking, collaboration, and project management



Medical


Emergency Medical Responder 9012: (CTE) 9-12

Credits: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This semester course provides students with advanced emergency medical information and skills. The course introduces students to a variety of career options in emergency medicine.


Exercise Science/Sports Medicine 9008: (CTE) 9-12

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This full-year course is designed to teach students components of exercise science/sports medicine; including exploration of therapeutic careers, medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, first aid, injury prevention principles, the healing process, rehabilitation techniques, therapeutic modalities, sport nutrition, sport psychology, and performance enhancement philosophies.


Food Nutrition I 9010: (CTE) 9-12

Credits: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course is designed to focus on the science of food and nutrition. Experiences will include food safety and sanitation, culinary technology, food preparation and dietary analysis to develop a healthy life style with pathways to career readiness. Laboratory based experiences strengthen comprehension of concepts and standards outlined in Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education. Student leadership and competitive events (FCCLA) may be integrated into this course.


Food Nutrition II 9011: (CTE) 9-12

Credits: 0.5

Prerequisites: Food Nutrition I

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course is designed to focus on principles of food preparation, sports nutrition, consumerism, and career options in the food industry. The study and application of nutrition, sanitation, food sciences and technology in this course provides students with laboratory-based experiences that will strengthen their comprehension of concepts and standards outlined in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education. FCCLA may be an integral part of this course.


Introduction to Health Science 9007: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Pre-Requisites:

Fees/Materials: None

Description: Health Science familiarizes students with the multitude of careers in the healthcare system.  Students receive instruction in anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, recognition of vital signs, and employability skills.


Medical Terminology 3006: (CTE) 9-12

Credits: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: A one-semester course that helps students understand the Greek- and Latin-based language of medicine and healthcare. Emphasis is placed upon word roots, suffixes, prefixes, abbreviations, symbols, anatomical terms, and terms associated with movements of the human body. This course also stresses the proper pronunciation, spelling, and usage of medical terminology. This class is helpful to anyone considering going in the healthcare field.


Engineering and Design


Introduction to Engineering Design 6000: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: Digital Studies

Description: This is the first in a series of STEM courses about engineering and technology.  This course focuses on the Engineering Design Process (EDP) and relates it to real world and laboratory based problems.  Students use the EDP to prototype and build projects related primarily to Civil, Mechanical, and Electrical Engineering. 


Principles of Engineering 6001: (CTE 9-12)

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: Digital Literacy, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry

Description: Students explore a broad range of engineering disciplines.  Introduction is made in the use of higher Science and Mathematics to include Physics and Calculus in the creation of solutions for end users.


Robotics 6003: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: (Optional: approximately $300 if attending regional competition) Description:

Description: Robotics challenges teams of young people and their mentors to solve a common problem in a six-week timeframe using a standard "kit of parts" and a common set of rules. Teams build robots from the parts and enter them in competitions.




Business 

Leadership Management Principles 9001: (CTE) 9-12

Credits 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: Students will explore the principles of relational leadership and learn to develop individual and group leadership skills to impact their lives and their communities. Content areas include decision-making, goal setting, effective communication, servant leadership, organization and time management skills, and concrete strategies to implement change.


Marketing I 9002: (CTE) 9-12

Credits: 0.5 Credits

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: Marketing I explores the seven core functions of marketing which include: marketing planning – why target market and industry affects businesses; marketing information management – why market research is important; pricing – how prices maximize profit and affect the perceived value; product/service management – why products live and die; promotion – how to inform customers about products; channel management – how products reach the final user; and selling – how to convince a customer that a product is the best choice. Students will utilize knowledge in hands-on projects which may include: Conducting research, creating a promotional plan, pitching a sales presentation, and introducing an idea for a new product/service.


Marketing II 9003: (CTE) 10-12

Credits: 0.5 Credits

Prerequisites: Marketing I

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This project-based course allows students to develop and demonstrate management level marketing skills. Students will learn advanced marketing principles then demonstrate proficiency by completing a marketing project. The majority of class time should be spent by students completing their marketing project. Examples of projects include: creating an advertising or public relations campaign, developing a business plan, conducting market research for a business and making suggestions for improvement, or completing an official CTSO (DECA, FBLA, FCCLA, HOSA, FFA, TSA, Skills USA) written project. Each project will include a written and presentation component.


Retailing 9013: (CTE) 9-12

Credit: 0.5 credits

Prerequisite: Marketing I

Description: This course will include understanding commercial transactions in which a buyer intends to consume the goods, products, or services to personal, family, and household use. Students will have hands-on experience assisting at concession stands and the school store.

Sports & Entertainment Marketing 9005: (CTE) 9-12

Credits: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This is an introductory course which will help students develop a thorough understanding of the marketing concepts and theories that apply to sports and sporting events. The areas this course will cover include basic marketing, target marketing and segmentation, sponsorship, event marketing, promotions, sponsorship proposals, and sports marketing plans. This course will also delve into the components of promotion plans, sponsorship proposals and the key elements needed in sports marketing plans.

English Language Arts

AP Literature (ELA) 11-12

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: Intended for 11th and 12th grade

Fees/Materials: Optional: AP Test Fee $87

Description: This course is designed to prepare students for the AP English Language and Composition Exam.


Basic Reading (E) 9-12

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisite: Students will be selected and placed in the class

Description: This course is designed for students who have been identified as requiring basic instruction in writing skills. This course will develop proficiency in reading skills and assist in preparing students to master the Utah State Language Arts core as demonstrated by passing the Utah Core State Standards.


British Literature: Heroes, Monsters, and Kings 1007: (E) 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: 9th Grade English

Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description: This 10th-12th grade elective covers a selection of works from British Literature rooted in the themes of Heroes, Monsters, and Kings. The range of texts span from British literature’s origins through the 20th century. Students will develop their literacy skills in the areas of reading, writing, and speaking and listening. Beginning with Beowulf, one the earliest written works of British literature, students will read and analyze this epic poem where a hero becomes a king by defeating a family of dreadful monsters.  Moving to the medieval period and to King Arthur’s Knights of the Round Table, students will study the concept of heroism through the narrative poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, one of the best known Arthurian stories. Shakespeare’s historical play Richard III depicts a power-hungry and bitter man who targets the throne of England. His monstrous actions help him win the crown, albeit for a short time. Students will consider Richard’s true character as he rises to power.The Gothic Novella, The Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, transports students into the 19th century. The concept of duality in the form of good vs. evil will be explored through an understanding of the concerns towards the end of Victorian era. Students will also study a selection of short stories from the 19th and 20th century concerning the key themes of this elective course.


Creative Writing 1004: (E) 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: Intended for 11th and 12th grade

Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description:  This course is designed as an introduction to imaginative writing. The study and writing of personal experience, character sketches, short fiction, and poetry are emphasized. Students have the opportunity to prepare manuscripts for publication, awards, and scholarships.


Current Events 4005: (E) 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: Intended for 11th and 12th grade

Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description:  The course is designed to discuss and explore topics of current interest that are published in newspaper, magazines, internet news sources, and social media.


English Language Arts 9 1000: (ELA) 9

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Description: The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) adopted by Utah in November 2010 will serve as the core for this class. The CCSS English Language Arts standards include college and career ready skills for writing, reading, speaking and listening. Successful mastery of the key concepts in this course will enable students to continue on a college-and-career ready path.


English Language Arts 9H (ELA) 9

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisites: Teacher Approval

Description: This course is designed for students who need more advanced instruction in reading comprehension; writing, speaking and listening as outlined in the Utah Core State Standards (UCSS) will serve as the core for this class. The UCSS English Language Arts standards include college and career ready skills for writing, reading, speaking and listening. Successful mastery of the key concepts in this course will enable students to continue on a college and-career ready path.


English Language Arts 10 1001: (ELA) 10

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Description: This course will focus on college and career ready anchor standards for English Language Arts found in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), which were adopted by Utah in November 2010. The English Language Arts standards include skills for writing, reading, speaking and listening. Successful mastery of the key concepts in this course will enable students to continue on a college-and-career ready path.


English Language Arts 10 H (ELA) 10

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisites: Teacher Approval

Description: This course is designed for students who qualify for more advanced instruction in reading comprehension, writing, speaking and listening. This course will focus on college and career ready anchor standards for English Language Arts found in the Utah Common Core State Standards (CCSS), which were adopted by Utah in November 2010. The English Language Arts standards include skills for writing, reading, speaking and listening. Successful mastery of the key concepts in this course will enable students to continue on a college-and-career ready path.


English Language Arts 11 1002: (ELA) 11

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Description: This course will focus on college and career ready anchor standards for English Language Arts found in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), which were adopted by Utah in November 2010. The English  Language Arts standards include skills for writing, reading, speaking, and listening. Successful mastery of the key concepts in this course will enable students to continue on a college-and-career ready path.


English Language Arts 12 1003: (ELA) 12

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisites: None

Description: This course will focus on college and career ready anchor standards for English Language Arts found in the Utah Core State Standards (UCSS). The English Language Arts standards include skills for writing, reading, speaking and listening. Successful mastery of the key concepts in this course will enable students to continue on a college-and-career ready path.


English Literature & Composition AP (ELA) 11th grade only

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisites: English 9-10

Description: This is an accelerated course designed to increase students’ abilities as skilled readers of literary text and poetry in a variety of genres. Students will critically read literature selections and write analytically about what they have read. The course emphasizes literary analysis of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement exam.

English Language & Composition AP (ELA) 12th grade only

Credits: 1.0

Prerequisites: English 9-11

Description: This is an accelerated course designed to increase students’ abilities as skilled readers of prose in a variety of genres. Students will write narrative, expository, and argumentative papers. The course emphasizes non-fiction reading and writing and is a good companion class to AP US History. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement exam.


Film Studies 1008:  (E) 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Description: This course provides an introduction to the tools of film analysis. Students will discuss and examine how elements like mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing and sound work together to create meaning in a range of film genres.

Speech and Debate 1005: (E) 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: Intended for 11th and 12th grade

Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description: This course is may be used for 12th grade English credit or for elective credit. Students will prepare for and present arguments in debate format. Arguments will revolve around issues of interest that may include current events and ethical dilemmas.

Financial Literacy


Financial Literacy 4004: (F) 11-12  

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: Intended for 11th Grade

Description: This course will prepare students for the choices and challenges of today’s financial markets. A better understanding of personal finance will help students move into adulthood making more informed monetary decisions, realizing a greater potential for personal wealth, and fostering a stronger state and national economy. The class will focus on income, money management, spending and credit, saving and investing, consumer protection, and risk management.

Healthy Lifestyles/ Physical Education


Aerobic Training 5011: (PE. E) 9-10

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

Description: This class will help students to develop personal fitness goals for cardiovascular fitness, strength, and flexibility. Cross-training activities will include aerobic dance, step aerobics, kickboxing, body toning, circuit and surge training, pilates, zumba, and fitness equipment training.


Athletics: Boys’ Soccer 5005: (PE,E) 9-10

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Register for this class if you plan to try out for team.

Description: This course is for students who compete on athletic teams. Register for this class if you plan to try out for team.


Athletics: Girls’ Soccer 5013: (PE,E) 9-10

Credit: 1.0  

Prerequisite: Register for this class if you plan to try out for team.

Description: This course is for students who compete on athletic teams.


College Athletics Participation 5012: (E) 9-10

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

Description: This course emphasizes the physical, social, and mental health dimensions people make in their lives and offers students an opportunity to evaluate health practices, products, and services. Elective credit only.


Drill Team (PE,E) 9-10

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Audition

Description: This course is for those interested in promoting school spirit through performance in extra-curricular activities.


Fitness for Life 5000: (PE) 10 Graduation Requirement

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course develops understanding of basic diagnostics of individual fitness, the exploration of various activities (focused on yoga, aerobics, etc.) to maintain fitness, the development of a personalized fitness program, and evaluation of general fitness and improvements in general fitness over the course of the class.


Health (Edgenuity) 5003: (H) 9-10

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course develops the skills needed to improve the quality of life by helping students to cope with and solve problems, develop positive self-image, and make better decisions. The students will explore positive lifestyles, disease prevention, emergency procedures, media literacy, and alcohol and drug abuse prevention.


Participation Skills & Techniques 5001: (PE,E) 9-10 Graduation Requirement

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course develops understanding of basic diagnostics of individual fitness, the exploration of various activities to maintain fitness, the development of a personalized fitness program, and evaluation of general fitness and improvements in general fitness over the course of the class. This course develops skills and techniques used in team sports including proper calisthenics and endurance training. Team sports covered may vary by term, instructor, student interest, and equipment/facilities.


U17 Team Practice: REAL Academy Players only 5006: (PE,E) 9-10

Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Required to be recruited by the REAL Salt Lake Professional Team

Description: Professional Soccer Training for REAL Salt Lake recruits


Weight Training I 5002: (PE,E) 9-10

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: None

Fees/Materials: None

Description: The emphasis in this course is on muscular strength, endurance, flexibility, and safety.  Weight room safety, warm-up/cool down procedures, lifting technique and safety for all lifts, major muscle identification, and individual goal setting are all important components in this course.  In addition, students will monitor and improve their fitness levels throughout the semester.  


Weight Training II 5010: (PE, E) 9-10

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisites: Weight Training I

Fees/Materials: None

Description: The emphasis in this course is on muscular strength, endurance, flexibility, and safety.  Weight room safety, warm-up/cool down procedures, lifting technique and safety for all lifts, major muscle identification, and individual goal setting are all important components in this course.  In addition, students will monitor and improve their fitness levels throughout the semester at an intermediate level.  

Yoga (PE,E) 9-10

Credit: 0.5

Prerequisite: None

Description: This class focuses on structural alignment, increase in strength and flexibility, it will deepen students’ awareness of breath and the role it has in generating energy and stamina in one’s mind and body. The course will also incorporate techniques for stress relief and enhances one’s physical performance by teaching students how to connect breath, organ systems, physiology, and anatomy all together. This is a participation grade.




MATHEMATICS COURSES


AP Calculus AB (Foundation/Core) 2004: (AAF-M) 11-12

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Mastery of Pre-calculus Concepts

Description: This is an introduction to differential and integral calculus topics, which are equivalent to a college level Calculus 1 course. The course uses advanced skills in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry to analyze real world problems involving movement and variable rates of change. Graphing calculator investigations are an integral part of the course and the AP exam. One semester of university credit can be earned with a successful performance on the AP exam.


AP Calculus BC (Foundation/Core) 2005: (AAF-M) 11-12 

Credit: 2.0
Prerequisite: Mastery of Pre-calculus Concepts

Description: This course teaches the extension of the differential and integral calculus topics of Calculus AB, which are equivalent to two semesters of college level Calculus 1 and 2 courses. The course uses advanced skills in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry to analyze real world problems involving movement and variable rates of change. This course focuses on the application of calculus using vectors, parametric/polar modeling, and power series. Graphing calculator investigations are an integral part of the course and the AP exam. Two semesters of university credit can be earned with a successful performance on the Advanced Placement exam.


Concepts in Probability and Statistics (Edgenuity) 2006: (M) 11-12

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: C or better in Mathematics III (or Algebra 2 and a Math ACT score of at least 23)
Fees/Materials: No Fee, Graphing calculator required

Description: Probability and Statistics is designed to introduce the methods used in the field of applied statistics.  Emphasis is given to basic concepts and techniques for collecting and analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and making predictions.  The major focus of this course is to provide students with experience in using the computer to solve problems which can be set ups a mathematical models.


Mathematics Lab I (E) 9

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Referred by Instructor

Description: A course designed to give students additional instruction to study mathematical concepts and receive extra tutorial help. Students will receive a pass/fail grade. Students who have failed College Prep Math Core 8 or struggling in Secondary Math I,II,III will be enrolled in this class.


Mathematics Lab II (E) 10

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Referred by Instructor

Description: A course designed to give students additional instruction to study mathematical concepts and receive extra tutorial help. Students will receive a pass/fail grade. Students who have failed College Prep Math Core 8 and/or Secondary Mathematics I are strongly encouraged to enroll in this class.


Mathematics Lab III (E) 11

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Referred by Instructor

Description:  A course designed to give students additional instruction to study mathematical concepts and receive extra tutorial help. Students will receive a pass/fail grade. Students who have failed College Prep Math Core 8, Secondary Mathematics I and/or II are strongly encouraged to enroll in this class


Secondary Mathematics I 2000: (M) 9 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Mastery of College Prep Math Core 8

Description: The main focus of Secondary Mathematics I is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Students will gain an understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential relationships, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Properties and theorems involving congruent figures will be used to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge.


Secondary Mathematics I H 2000-H: (M) 9 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Mastery of College Prep Math Core 8

Description: The main focus of Secondary Mathematics IH is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Students will gain an understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential relationships, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Properties and theorems involving congruent figures will be used to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge. Vectors and matrices, additional Pre-Calculus topics, will also be studied in the honors class so as to prepare students to take AP Calculus their 12th grade year.


Secondary Mathematics II 2001: (M) 10 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Mastery of Secondary Mathematics I

Description: The main focus of Secondary II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions and comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships. Extension of the set of rational numbers and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratics equations can be solved. Students will explore conditional probability and counting methods in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity, Pythagorean relationships, and circles will tie back to quadratics with their quadratic algebraic representations.


Secondary Mathematics II H 2001-H: (M) 10

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Mastery of Secondary Mathematics IH

Description: The main focus of Secondary II Honors is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions and comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships. Extension of the set of rational numbers and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratics equations can be solved. Students will explore conditional probability and counting methods in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity, Pythagorean relationships, and circles will tie back to quadratics with their quadratic algebraic representations. The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, along with additional probability and geometric concepts, will also be studied in the honors class so as to prepare students to take AP Calculus their 12th grade year.


Secondary Mathematics III 2002: (M) 11 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Mastery of Secondary Mathematics II

Description: The main focus of Secondary Mathematics III Honors is for students to make connections and apply the concepts they learned in Secondary I and II. Students will apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. They will expand their knowledge of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students will further develop their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles. Finally, they will create geometric and functional models to solve contextual problems.


Secondary Mathematics III H 2002-H: (M) 11 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Mastery of Secondary Mathematics II H

Description: The main focus of Secondary Mathematics III is for students to make connections and apply the concepts they learned in Secondary I and II. Students will apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. They will expand their knowledge of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students will further develop their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles. Finally, they will create geometric and functional models to solve contextual problems. In the honors class, students will extend Secondary III math concepts to include polynomials with complex numbers, work with the Binomial Theorem, apply laws of trigonometry, and use further extend probability concepts. These extra topics will prepare students to take AP Calculus upon completion of Secondary III H.

SCIENCE COURSES


Biology 3000: (S) 9-12

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: None

Description: The biology core course includes three major concepts: (1) the structures in all living things occur as a result of necessary, (2) interactions of organisms in an environment are determined by the biotic and abiotic components of the environment, (3) evolution of species occurs over time and is related to the environment in which the species live. Biology students will design and perform experiments through inquiry as the fundamental scientific process. 


Biology H (S) 9-12 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: A or B in previous science class

Description: The biology core has three major concepts for the focus of instruction: (1) the structures in all living things occur as a result of necessary functions. (2) Interactions of organisms in an environment are determined by the abiotic components of the environment. (3) Evolution of species occurs over time and is related to the environment in which the species live. Biology students will design and perform experiments through inquiry as the fundamental scientific process. Honors Biology places more emphasis on understanding the core through the use of math.


Biology AP  3008: (S) 9-12 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: A or B in previous year science course

Description: This is a full-year introductory college course in biology with laboratory. The major content areas are molecules and cells; heredity and evolution; and organisms and populations. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the AP exam.


Chemistry 3003: (S) 9-12 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: None

Description: This course is organized around major concepts of matter, structure, energy, and change. The concepts, principles and laws that describe the conservation of matter, changes in the structure of matter, and changes in energy will provide focus for this course. Chemistry students should design and perform experiments, and value inquiry as the fundamental scientific process.


Chemistry H (S) 9-12 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Teacher signature

Description: This course is organized around major concepts of matter, structure, energy, and change. Chemistry students should design and perform experiments and value inquiry as the fundamental scientific process. Honors Chemistry places more emphasis on understanding the core curriculum through the use of mathematics. It is recommended that students have completed or are enrolled in Secondary II.


Chemistry AP  (S) 11-12 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Chemistry with an A or Honor’s with a B grade, labs at the U of highly recommended but not required

Description: AP Chemistry is a full-year introductory college course. The study includes advanced theoretical and physical understanding of chemistry. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the AP exam.


Earth Science 3010: (E) 9 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: None

Description: This course focuses on sciences concerned with origin, structure and physical phenomena of the Earth. Earth Science integrates content from Earth, physical and space sciences. Students develop an understanding of interactions and interdependence within and between the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere.


Physics  9-12 

Credit: 1.0 credits
Prerequisite: None

Description: The physics  curriculum is divided into the following major topics: motion, force, energy, matter, waves, electricity and magnetism.  The study is developed around systems and the nature of science and helps students understand the close relationship between them. It is recommended that the student take Mathematics I and II before taking this course.


Elective Science

Astronomy 3004: (AAF-S) 10-12 

Credit: .5
Prerequisite: None

Description: This is a course that investigates astronomy, aeronautics, and biology in an aerospace setting. Various classroom and laboratory experiences provide students with an understanding of each area and its relationship to the others.


Biotechnology 3007: 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: Biology

Description: An exploration into the fascinating world of modern DNA science and laboratory analysis. The course will provide a lecture and hands-on participation in the application of modern DNA science and laboratory analysis to forensics, medicine, the environment, food science, agriculture and the arts.


Environmental Science 3011: (Edgenuity)

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: None
Fees/Materials: None

Description: This course emphasizes the function of the earth’s system. Prominence is placed on the human interactions with the Earth’s geologic and environmental systems, predictability of a dynamic Earth, origin and evolution of the Earth system and universe, geochemical cycles and energy in the Earth system.


Medical Anatomy and Physiology 3001: (AAF-S) 10-12

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: None, Intended for 11-12th grade
Fees/Materials: None

Description: This full-year course provides students with an in-depth study of healthcare careers including actual clinical experience in a variety of areas. Instruction includes intermediate anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, diseases and disorders, medical ethics and first aid. The class is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Health Science course and/or for a variety of health technology programs.


Medical Math 2003: (E) 9-12

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: Secondary Mathematics II (or Geometry & Algebra I)
Fees/Materials: No Fee, Scientific calculator, compass, protractor, straight edge

Description: An instructional program that prepares students with skills to compute mathematical equations related to healthcare. The course integrates medical-physiological concepts and mathematics. Students will engage in math activities including problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connections, and representations.

SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES


Geography for Life 4000: (SS) 9

Credit: .5
Prerequisites: None

Description:  This course introduces students to cultural and physical geography. The framework of this course is the five themes of geography: location, place, human interaction with the physical environment, the impact of movements of people, ideas, and things; and similarities and differences within and between regions. In addition, the course emphasizes critical, causal, interpretive and reflective thinking skills through observing, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and problem solving.


U.S. Government and Citizenship 61281 (SS) 11-12 

Credit: .5
Prerequisites: None

Description: The goal of this course is to foster informed, responsible participation in public life. Knowing how to be a good citizen is essential to the preservation and improvement of United States democracy. Upon completion of this course, the student will understand the major ideas, protections, privileges, structures, and economic systems that affect the life of a citizen in the United States political system. This course is recommended for seniors due to their proximity to voting and draft age


Human Geography AP 4006: (SS) 9 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: None

Description:  This college-level course covers the nature and perspectives of geography, population, cultural patterns and processes, political organization of space, agricultural and rural land use, industrialization and economic development, and cities and urban land use. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the AP exam.


Psychology I 4013: (SS,E) 9-12  (Edgenuity)

Credit: 0.5
Prerequisites: None

Description: This course covers human behavior including the development of personality, learning, memory, development, and abnormal psychology. It also includes experiments and classroom participation.


Psychology II (SS,E) 9-12 

Credit: 0.5
Prerequisites: Psychology I

Description:  The course covers topics about psychology not covered in Psych 1. The topics covered are about the brain, sensation & perception, states of consciousness, motivation, gender, and social psychology.


Sociology I 4014: (SS,E) 9-12 (Edgenuity) 

Credit: 0.5
Prerequisites: None

Description:  This course is the systematic study of human society. Topics to be covered include basic theories of interpersonal and group interaction, culture, socialization, groups and their effect on the individual, deviance and crime, race and ethnicity, religion, social class, the family, gender roles and the environment.


U.S. Government and Citizenship  4003: (SS) 11-12 

Credit: 0.5
Prerequisites: None

Description:  The goal of this course is to foster informed, responsible participation in public life. Knowing how to be a good citizen is essential to the preservation and improvement of United States democracy. Upon completion of this course, the student will understand the major ideas, protections, privileges, structures, and economic systems that affect the life of a citizen in the United States political system. This course is recommended for seniors due to their proximity to voting and draft age.


U.S. History 4002: (SS) 11 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: None

Description: Understanding United States history is essential for the continuation of our democratic society. This course will help students make connections between their world and the rich heritage of United States history. The course is designed as a survey of American history with an emphasis on post-Reconstruction American (1876-Present), but should include a review of the earlier period. This course is a core requirement for graduation.


U.S. History AP 4008: (SS) 11 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: None

Description: This course is a college-level course in American history from the period of the first European explorations of the Americas to the present. The course emphasizes political institutions and behavior, public policy, social and economic change, diplomacy and human relations, and cultural and intellectual developments. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the AP exam. This course fulfills the core requirement for graduation.


World Civilizations 4001: (SS) 10 

Credit: 0.5
Prerequisites: None

Description:  The study of World Civilizations emphasizes the increasing interrelationships over time of the world’s peoples. This course examines the interrelationships developed among major regions of the world: East Asia, South Asia, Southwest Asia (Middle East), Africa, Europe, North America and Latin America. It also explores how interrelationships have developed within all aspects of human activity: political, economic, social, philosophical and religious, scientific and technological, and artistic. This course is a core requirement for graduation.


World History AP 4007: (SS) 10-12

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: None

Description:  This college-level course helps students develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. The course covers the period from approximately 1000 C.E. to the present and focuses on Asian, African, Islamic, and Latin American History. University credit can be earned with a successful performance on the AP exam. This fulfills the core requirement for graduation.

WORLD LANGUAGE COURSES


Spanish 1 1051: (E) 9-11

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: None

Description: By the end of your first year of language study, you can understand and say a lot in Spanish using basic lists or memorized phrases. You can read and write in the language as well. You will be able to give personal information about yourself and information about your friends and family and school. You can express your likes and dislikes, preferences and needs, and begin to use the language for some daily functions like making simple requests buying things like food in a restaurant. Knowledge of culture helps you to function in a socially appropriate manner in Spanish.


Spanish 2 1052: (E) 9-12 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Spanish I

Description: By the end of your second year of language study, you can understand and say a lot in Spanish using simple sentences, mostly in the present tense. You are able to begin participating in conversations, and ask a broader range of questions to get information you need in daily life such as buying clothes or ordering food at a café. You can read and write in the language as well, connecting longer strings of sentences into more unique and personal expression. You begin working on telling about your life in the past tense and projecting events in the future. Knowledge of culture helps you to function in a socially appropriate manner in Spanish.


Spanish 3 1053: (E) 9-12

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Spanish II

Description: During your third year of language study, you will confidently be able to function if you were to travel to a place where only Spanish is spoken. You can speak and write to express yourself and your personal needs of daily life. You are confident engaging in direct conversations about daily life, and can narrate and describe in past, present and future with some control. In your language study this year you explore ideas and concepts such as current issues of immigration, the environment, health or cultural diversity. You will begin reading authentic Spanish and/or Latin American literature.


Spanish 4 H (E) 9-11

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Spanish III

Description: Spanish 4 Honors takes a holistic approach to language acquisition structured around the following themes: global challenges, science and technology, contemporary life, personal and public identities, families and communities, and beauty and aesthetics. This course strives to promote both fluency and accuracy in language with an emphasis on learning language structures in context and using them to construct and communicate meaning. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, this course is taught almost exclusively in Spanish.



SPECIALIZED COURSES:STUDENT DEVELOPMENT/INVOLVEMENT


Peer Tutoring 108: (E) 11-12

Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Good attendance and 3.0 GPA

Description: Students in this course work under the supervision of Special Education teachers in assisting students who have special learning needs. It is designed for individuals who are interested in pursuing a career in the fields such as in education, sociology, psychology, or social work. Because Academic Peer Tutors are placed in a position of trust, they are expected to be highly responsible and mature in judgment.


AP Research: (E) 11-12 

Credit: 0.5
Prerequisites: Counselor Approval (must have at least 2 AP courses)

Description: This course is an extension of class time in AP and core concurrent courses (English, math, science, social studies) that do not have an additional Lab class. Students with three or more AP or core concurrent courses are eligible for this course. The curriculum of AP and core concurrent courses is structured with the expectation of additional time for students to understand and process the large amounts of reading, writing, and information.


Expanded Learning (E) 11-12 

Credit: 0.5
Prerequisites: Counselor Approval

Description:  Based on number of CE Courses,  (must have 2 Concurrent Enrollment and 2 Edgenuity courses)


Office Aide 106: (E) 11-12

Credit: None
Prerequisites: Limited to Juniors/Seniors with Office approval, must be on-track for graduation, 2.5 GPA
Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description: Students assist the front office staff in doing basic clerical work (never anything for student files), basic tidying-up, and otherwise assisting the front-office staff.


Teacher Aide 105: (E) 11-12

Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisites: Limited to Juniors/Seniors with Office approval, must be on-track for graduation, 2.5 GPA
Fees/Materials: No Fee

Description: Students assist teachers by tutoring peers, doing basic clerical work (never grades or attendance) and otherwise assisting a teacher.


Student Government (E) (Cabinet) 9-12

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: By election

Description:  Fulfill elected office with its associated duties.


Student Leadership 103: (E) 9-12

Credit: 0.5 (This course may be taken multiple times for credit)
Prerequisites: On track for graduation and maintaining all grades at “C” or better previous term
Fees/Materials: None

Description: Students in this course are responsible for planning student activities and representing student concerns to the faculty and administration.


Yearbook 110: (E) 11-12 

Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Application required

Description: Interested in photography, graphic design, and journalism? Want to be more involved in school activities and meet people? Come join the Yearbook Staff! We will learn desktop publishing, graphic design, typography, photography, photo editing, and more while creating the school’s yearbook.



CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT


ART 1010 (A) 11-12 

Division: Fine Arts 

Department: Visual Arts 

Course: ART1010 

Title: Intro to Visual Arts 

Description: This is an introductory course for non-art majors in which students will learn to understand and appreciate art through the study of the visual language. This course illustrates the place of art in a broader cultural context. Emphasis is placed on helping the students develop judgement in art analyses and criticism


BUS 1210 Course  (CTE) 11-12

Division: Social and Behavioral Science

Department: Business,Home and Family Studies

Course: BUS 1210

Title: Personal and Consumer Finance

Description: This course will introduce personal and consumer financial concepts and give students basic tools to make sound financial decisions in today's society based on economic trends and research. This is a practical course in personal money management consisting of financial planning including career choices, budgeting, planning for retirement, financing a home and automobile, and understanding consumer credit, taxes, insurance, and investments. Students will use basic math skills as well as read, write, and think critically. Note: This course is cross-listed as HFST 1210 and meets general education requirements for Social and Behavioral Science.


CJ 1010 Course  (SS, E) 11-12

Division: Fine Arts, Communication, and New Media

Course: CJ 1010

Title: Introduction to Mass Media

Description: This course is an introduction to the American Criminal Justice System including the history, functions, and processes of its major components - law enforcement, courts, and corrections.


COMM 1500 Course  (CTE) 11-12

Division: Fine Arts, Communication, and New Media

Course: COMM 1500

Title: Introduction to Mass Media

Description: This course is an introduction into the nature of media and its relationship with the individual. The course teaches students to analyze, assess and evaluate popular culture, literature, and media. It includes a focus on various mediums including literature, radio, television, film, books, newspaper, and advertising to assist students in looking at the big picture of how media affects their perceptions.  


COMM 2110 Course (E) 11-12

Division: Fine Arts, Communication, and New Media

Department: Communication

Course: COMM 2110

Title: Interpersonal Communication

Description: The study of interpersonal communication is the study of interaction between people. It is not only the conversation, but the study of relationships, problems, and situations and how they can be dealt with in an effective manner. This course is designed to study interpersonal communication from a descriptive as well as analytical point of view. The topics of interpersonal relationships, self-concept, perception, emotions, verbal and nonverbal language, listening, intimacy, climate, and conflict will be discussed. Possible methods of enhancing interpersonal communication situations will be practiced through discussion, role play, writing, critical evaluation, feedback and observance.


ENGL 1010 Course (LA, E) 11-12

Division: Humanities

Department: English

Course: ENGL 1010

Title: Intro to Writing

Description: This course emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking skills through writing-intensive workshops. It explores writing situations as a complex process focusing specifically on idea generation relative to audience and purpose, working through multiple drafts, peer collaboration, and revision, and it includes rhetorical analysis.


FREN 1010 Course (FL, E) 9-11

Division: World Language

Department: French

Course: FREN 1010

Title: Elementary French I

Description: This course provides an introduction to the French language and the cultures of French Speaking peoples. It is designed for students with no previous French study. During the course, students develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use French in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write French at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, homeschool, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation and basic conversation practice in French.  

 

FREN 1020 Course (FL, E) 9-12

Division: World Language

Department: French

Course: FREN 1020

Title: Elementary French II

Prereq: One year, highly recommended, of secondary instruction in this language w/ a "C" or better or instructor permission. Approved by USBE 10th grade.


Description: During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use French in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write French at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in French, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College. 03030013063 French - CE 1020 Prereq: FREN 1010 or equivalent knowledge. Approved by USBE for 10th grade.


GEOG 1300 Course (SS) 11-12

Division: Social and Behavioral Science

Department: Social Sciences

Course: GEOG 1300

Title: People and Places of the World

Description: This course is a study of the major geographical regions of the world, emphasizing the interrelationships between environment and human imprints. The course focuses on the following issues and problems: distribution of cultural characteristics such as population, migration, language, religion, social customs, political and economic geography, urban patterns and settlements, agriculture, industry and resources. Physical geography concepts are also used to explain spatial patterns of cultural features.


HFST 1500 Course (SS) 11-12

Division: Social and Behavioral Science

Department: Home and Family Studies

Course: HFST 1500

Title: Human Development

Description: In this course students learn about the fundamental principles of growth and development from conception through childhood to old age. The course includes the study of the biological process of development, as well as the emotional, social and cognitive development of the individual within a cultural and historical context.


HIST 2700 Course (SS) 11-12


Division: Social and Behavioral Science

Department: Social Sciences

Course: HIST 2700

Title: United States History to 1877

Description:  This course covers the development of the United States to 1877, to include the Colonial Period, the American Revolution, the Nationalistic Period, Westward Expansion, Sectionalism, the Civil War and Reconstruction. This course, taken in conjunction with HIST 2710, will satisfy the American Institutions requirement. 09090013010 Social Studies Elective CE This course is offered for one year and earns core credit. Students must complete only one American Institutions general education class for college graduation.


HIST 2710 Course (SS) 11-12

Division: Social and Behavioral Science

Department: Social Sciences

Course: HIST 2710

Title: United States History from 1877

Description: This course covers the development of the United States from 1877 to the present, to include Industrialism, the Last Frontier, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and New Deal, World War II, the Cold War Era, the Civil Rights Movement, and Contemporary America. 09050013050 U S History II CE Students completing HIST 2700 alone will earn SS GenEd credit. Students completing HIST 2700 and 2710 will earn AI GenEd credit.


MATH 1010 (MA) 11-12

Division: Mathematics

Department: Mathematics

Course: MATH 1010

Title:  Intermediate Algebra

Prerequisite: This course is intended to prepare students for college level mathematics courses. Math 1010 is for students who do not meet the prerequisite for higher level math courses

Description: Intermediate Algebra provides the necessary background for: MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning, MATH 1040 Statistics, MATH 1050 College Algebra, and MATH 1090 College Algebra for Business Students. This course DOES NOT satisfy the Regents' Scholarship math requirement.


MATH 1030 (MA) 11-12

Division: Mathematics

Department: Mathematics

Course: MATH 1030

Title: Quantitative Literacy 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math Secondary I, II, and III — C average or better course grade in all three classes. Students who do not have a C average or better course grade in all three classes may place into this class with an ACT Math score of at least 21 or appropriate placement test score.

Description: This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling and problem solving utilizing algebra, discrete mathematics, geometry and statistics. Furthermore, students will examine some of the greatest ideas of humankind – ideas comparable to the works of Shakespeare, Plato, and Michelangelo. Imagination, creativity, and sound logic will all be crucial components of these mathematical explorations. The overarching theme of the course is to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for math and its many applications to the world around us. There are three basic goals for this course: To attain a better understanding of some rich mathematical ideas; To build sharper skills for analyzing life issues that transcend mathematics; To develop a new perspective and outlook on the way you view the world. grade in all three classes may place into this class with an ACT Math score of at least 21 or appropriate placement test score.


MATH 1040 (MA) 11-12

Division: Mathematics

Department: Mathematics

Course: MATH 1040

Title: Intro to Statistics 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math Secondary I, II, and III — C average or better course grade in all three classes. Students who do not have a C average or better course grade in all three classes may place into this class with an ACT Math score of at least 22 or appropriate placement test score.

Description: Introduction to Statistics is an elementary introduction to the nature of statistical reasoning. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics, sampling and data collection, basic probability, sampling distribution, and introduction to inference including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 preferred). 07060013010 Statistics Elective CE Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math Secondary I, II, and III — C average or better course grade in all three classes. Students who do not have a C average or better course grade in all three classes may place into this class with an ACT Math score of at least 22 or appropriate placement test score.


MATH 1050 (MA) 11-12

Division: Mathematics

Department: Mathematics

Course: MATH 1050

Title: College Algebra

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math Secondary I, II, and III

Description:College Algebra In this course students will study polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Additional topics include sequences and series, conic sections, matrices, the binomial theorem, modeling, and graphing technology. This course prepares students for trigonometry and calculus. Precalculus Elective CE Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math


PSY 1010 Course (SS) 11-12

Division: Social and Behavioral Science
Department: Social Sciences
Course: PSY 1010
Title: Intro to Psychology

Description: This course introduces students to the discipline of sociology and its unifying objective of linking broad cultural and institutional social forces to personal experiences and human behavior. Using sociological theories and research methods, an examination will be given to diverse sociological perspectives and topics such as culture, family, gender, ethnicity, crime, etc. General education credit and variable credit may be earned. To fulfill social science general education requirements, the class must be taken for 3 credits; however 1-2 variable elective credits are offered for exigent circumstances.

POLS 1100 Course (SS) 12

Division: Social and Behavioral Science

Department: Social Sciences

Course: POLS 110

Title: American National Government

Description:  This course is an introduction to the structure, function, and political dynamics of the major institutions within the American governmental system.  Course as taught must cover 90% of public ed objectives.


SOC 1010 Course (SS) 11-12

Division: Social and Behavioral Science

Department: Social Sciences

Course: SOC 1010

Title: Principles of Sociology

Description:This course introduces students to the nature and scope of sociology, including a systematic treatment of group life, social institutions, social processes, social change, and social control.

EDGENUITY COURSES 


ENGLISH COURSES


LITERACY & COMPREHENSION I (E)

Credit: 0.5

Description: This course is one of two intervention courses designed to support the development of strategic reading and writing skills. These courses use a thematic and contemporary approach, including high interest topics to motivate students and expose them to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Both courses offer an engaging technology-based interface that inspires and challenges students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.


LITERACY & COMPREHENSION II (E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade, this course works in conjunction with Literacy & Comprehension I to use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real world texts. Each of these reading intervention courses offers an engaging, technology-based interface that inspires and challenges high school and middle school students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.


EXPOSITORY READING AND WRITING (E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: This elective English course is designed to develop critical reading and writing skills while preparing high school students to meet the demands of college-level work. While students will explore some critical reading skills in fiction, poetry, and drama the focus of this course will be on expository and persuasive texts and the analytical reading skills that are necessary for college success. Students will read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Walt Whitman, Abraham Lincoln, Cesar Chavez, Martin Luther King Jr., Langston Hughes, Julia Alvarez, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Gary Soto. 

 

INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATIONS AND SPEECH (E)

Credit: 0.5

Description: Beginning with an introduction that builds student understanding of the elements, principles, and characteristics of human communication, this course offers fascinating insight into verbal and nonverbal messages and cultural and gender differences in the areas of listening and responding. High school students enrolled in this one-semester course will be guided through engaging lectures and interactive activities, exploring themes of self-awareness and perception in communication. The course concludes with units on informative and persuasive speeches, and students are given the opportunity to critique and analyze speeches.


IDEA WRITING–INSTRUCTION TO DEVELOP EXPOSITORY & APPLIED WRITING (E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: Motivating students in grades nine through twelve to become more articulate and effective writers, this one-semester course offers hands-on experience writing personal reflections, definition essays, research essays, persuasive essays, informative essays, and literary analysis essays. Offering targeted lessons on reputable research, effective communication, solid grammar, and compelling style, this one-semester course utilizes the Six Traits of Effective Writing as an overarching framework. Students enrolled in this course develop the skills necessary to evaluate their own writing and articulate and apply writing and researching strategies. In addition, students get further practice applying the grammatical rules of standard American English in formal writing.


CLASSIC NOVELS AND AUTHOR STUDIES (E)
Credit: 1.0

Description: The Classic Novels mini-courses give students the opportunity to fully explore a large work of fiction or to be introduced to a celebrated author. Designed to stand alone or to be inserted into an existing Edgenuity course, each mini-course guides students through the work with lectures, web activities, journals, and homework/practice. Students study the following novels: 1984, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Call of the Wild, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Heart of Darkness, Jane Eyre, Macbeth, Mrs. Dalloway, Portrait of the Artist, Robinson Crusoe, The House of Seven Gables, The Red Badge of Courage, and The Three Musketeers along with the following author studies: Jorge Luis Borges and Flannery O’Connor.



MATHEMATICS


FINANCIAL MATH (E)
Credit: 1.0

Description: Connecting practical mathematical concepts to personal and business settings, this course offers informative and highly useful lessons that challenge students to gain a deeper understanding of financial math. Relevant, project-based learning activities cover stimulating topics such as personal financial planning, budgeting and wise spending, banking, paying taxes, the importance of insurance, long-term investing, buying a house, consumer loans, economic principles, traveling abroad, starting a business, and analyzing business data. Offered as a two-semester course for high school students, this course encourages mastery of math skill sets, including percentages, proportions, data analysis, linear systems, and exponential functions.


CONCEPTS IN PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (AAF-M)
Credit: 1.0

Description: This full-year high school course provides an alternative math credit for students who may not wish to pursue more advanced mathematics courses such as Algebra II and Pre-Calculus. The first half of the course begins with an in-depth study of probability and an exploration of sampling and comparing populations and closes with units on data distributions and data analysis. In the second half of the course, students create and analyze scatterplots and study two-way tables and normal distributions. Finally, students apply probability to topics such as conditional probability, combinations and permutations, and sets.

TRIGONOMETRY (E)      
Credit: 0.5

Description: In this one-semester course, students use their geometry and algebra skills to begin their study of trigonometry. Students will be required to express understanding using qualitative, quantitative, algebraic, and graphing skills. This course begins with a quick overview of right-triangle relationships before introducing trigonometric functions and their applications. Students explore angles and radian measures, circular trigonometry, and the unit circle. Students extend their understanding to trigonometric graphs, including the effects of translations and the inverses of trigonometric functions. This leads to the laws of sines and cosines, followed by an in-depth exploration of trigonometric identities and applications. This course ends with an introduction to the polar coordinate system, complex numbers, and DeMoivre’s theorem.


SCIENCE


LIFE SCIENCE (E)
Credit: 1.0

Description:Examining a broad spectrum of the biological sciences, Life Science is a full-year course for middle school students that builds on basic principles of scientific inquiry and translates those skills to more complex, overarching biological themes. The course includes units that help students understand the definitions, forms, and classifications of living organisms and learn to analyze the diversity of each unique group of living organisms. Other units introduce students to the structures and functions of cells, cell theory, and cell reproduction. These larger themes are then applied to other topics, such as genetics, Darwinian theory, and human biology and health. An introduction of ecology draws all of these concepts together to examine the interrelationships that help to maintain life on Earth.


EARTH SCIENCE (E)
Credit: 1.0

Description: Students enrolled in this dynamic course explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. Earth Science is a two-semester course that provides a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and examines how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


PHYSICAL SCIENCE (AAF-S)
Credit: 1.0

Description: This full-year course focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available.


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (AAF-S)
Credit: 1.0

Description: Environmental science is a captivating and rapidly expanding field, and this two-semester course offers compelling lessons that cover many aspects of the field: ecology, the biosphere, land, forests and soil, water, energy and resources, and societies and policy. Through unique activities and material, high school students connect scientific theory and concepts to current, real-world dilemmas, providing them with opportunities for mastery in each of the segments throughout the semester.


SOCIAL STUDIES


SURVEY OF WORLD HISTORY(SS,E)
Credit: 1.0

Description: This yearlong course examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.


MODERN WORLD HISTORY (SS,E)
Credit: 1.0

Description: This yearlong course examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.


SURVEY OF U.S. HISTORY (SS,E)
Credit: 1.0

Description: This one-year high school course presents a cohesive and comprehensive overview of the history of the United States, surveying the major events and turning points of U.S. history as it moves from the Era of Exploration through modern times. As students examine each era of history, they will analyze primary sources and carefully research events to gain a clearer understanding of the factors that have shaped U.S. history. In early units, students will assess the foundations of U.S. democracy while examining crucial documents. In later units, students will examine the effects of territorial expansion, the Civil War, and the rise of industrialization. They will also assess the outcomes of economic trends and the connections between culture and government. As the course draws to a close, students will focus their studies on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of cultural diversity while examining history from different perspectives.


ECONOMICS (CTE)
Credit: Available as either 0.5 or 1.0

Description: This course invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives—including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical-thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data displays and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats.


SOCIOLOGY (SS,E)
Credit: 0.5

Description:  Providing insight into the human dynamics of our diverse society, this is an engaging, one-semester course that delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. This interactive course, designed for high school students, covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, the economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior, both historically and in modern times. tion: This two-semester course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development.


CAREER & TECHNOLOGY


STRATEGIES FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS (CTE,E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: Offering a comprehensive analysis of different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles, this one-semester course encourages high school and middle school students to take control of their learning by exploring varying strategies for success. Providing engaging lessons that will help students identify what works best for them individually, this one-semester course covers important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques.


CAREER EXPLORATIONS (CTE,E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: This course prepares middle school students to make informed decisions about their future academic and occupational goals. Through direct instruction, interactive skill demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn how to assess their own skills and interests, explore industry clusters and pathways, and develop plans for career and academic development. This course is designed to provide flexibility for students; any number of units can be selected to comprise a course that meets the specific needs of students.


HEALTH SCIENCE CONCEPTS (CTE,E)
Credit: 1.0

Description: This yearlong course introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.


INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (CTE,E)
Credit: 1.0

Description: In this two‐semester introductory course, students learn the principles of business using real‐world examples—learning what it takes to plan and launch a product or service in today’s fast‐ paced business environment. This course covers an introduction to economics, costs and profit, and different business types. Students are introduced to techniques for managing money, personally and as a business, and taxes and credit; the basics of financing a business; how a business relates to society both locally and globally; how to identify a business opportunity; and techniques for planning, executing, and marketing a business to respond to that opportunity.


INTRODUCTION TO CODING (CTE,E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: Intro to Coding covers a basic introduction to the principles of programming, including algorithms and logic. Students engage in hands-on programming tasks in the Python programming language as they write and test their own code using the approaches real programmers use in the field. Students will program with variables, functions and arguments, and lists and loops, providing a solid foundation for more advanced study as well as practical skills they can use immediately Microsoft, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Office are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Python is a registered trademark of the Python Software Foundation. Adobe and Illustrator are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. Audacity is a registered trademark of Dominic Mazzoni. © Copyright Edgenuity, Inc.


INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP(CTE,E)

Credit: 0.5

Description: This one-semester course teaches the key skills and concepts students need to know to plan and launch a business. Students learn about real-life teen entrepreneurs; characteristics of successful entrepreneurs; how to attract investors and manage expenses; sales stages, planning, and budgeting; how to generate business ideas and create a business plan; and how to promote and market a company. Topics include exploring factors of business success and failure, economic systems, competition, production, costs and pricing, accounting, bookkeeping and financial reporting, working with others, and successfully managing employees.


INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SCIENCE (CTE,E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: This high school course introduces students to a variety of healthcare careers, as they develop the basic skills required in all health and medical sciences. In addition to learning the key elements of the U.S. healthcare system, students learn terminology, anatomy and physiology, pathologies, diagnostic and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and the fundamentals of medical emergency care. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the healthcare field.


INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (CTE,E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: This course introduces students to the essential technical and professional skills required in the field of Information Technology (IT). Through hands-on projects and written assignments, students gain an understanding of the operation of computers, computer networks, Internet fundamentals, programming, and computer support. Students also learn about the social impact of technological change and the ethical issues related to technology. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the field of IT.


MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY(CTE,E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: This semester-long course introduces students to the structure of medical terms, plus medical abbreviations and acronyms. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to health care settings, medical procedures, pharmacology, human anatomy and physiology, and pathology. The knowledge and skills gained in this course provide students entering the health care field with a deeper understanding of the application of the language of health and medicine. Students are introduced to these skills through direct instruction, interactive tasks, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments.


PERSONAL FINANCE (CTE,E)
Credit: 0.5

Description: This introductory finance course teaches what it takes to understand the world of finance and make informed decisions about managing finances. Students learn more about economics and become more confident in setting and researching financial goals as they develop the core skills needed to be successful. In this one-semester course, students learn how to open bank accounts, invest money, apply for loans, apply for insurance, explore careers, manage business finances, make decisions about major purchases, and more. Students will be inspired by stories from finance professionals and individuals who have reached their financial goals.


PROJECTS IN AUDIO ENGINEERING (CTE,E)
Credit: 1.0

Description:  This introductory, supplemental course teaches the four main steps of professional audio engineering: recording, editing, mixing, and mastering. Through a series of Audacity® software projects, students learn tones and waveforms, recording studios and formats, Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) and Digital Audio Workstations (DAWs), syncing audio, and many other topics relating to the field of audio engineering. Activities include echo and reverb effects; encoding and exporting audio; mastering audio files and mixing samples to create a new track; equalizing, compressing, and normalizing audio files; and adding fading and crossfading.

PROJECTS IN GAME DESIGN (CTE,E)
Credits: 1.0

Description: Utilizing the Multimedia Fusion 2 software program, this supplemental course allows students to build a solid foundation in the fundamentals of game design and development. Students create an impressive portfolio of interactive, engaging games such as a classic two-player Ping-Pong game, a block-breaking action game, and a maze game with moving obstacles. Students learn the MMF2 language of events, conditions, and actions; game objects that track scores, lives, time, and more; and automated, random, and user-controlled movement. Topics include libraries, game sounds, and game-design concepts including objects, layers and frames, cursors and crosshairs, pixels and coordinates, calculations, title and end screens, and looping animations.


ART


INTRODUCTION TO ART (A)
Credit: 0.5

Description: Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, this course offers high school students an in-depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this one-semester course cover topics including early medieval and Romanesque art; art in the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries; fifteenth-century art in Europe; sixteenth-century art in Italy; the master artists; High Renaissance and baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; eighteenth-and nineteenth-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the Americas.


ART HISTORY I (A)
Credit: 0.5

Description: Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, this course offers high school students an in-depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this one-semester course cover topics including early medieval and Romanesque art; art in the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries; fifteenth-century art in Europe; sixteenth-century art in Italy; the master artists; High Renaissance and baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; eighteenth-and nineteenth-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the American periods and places; prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400.



Courses are offered on a student demand basis and so some courses may not be available if the student need/want is not high enough.